Reading Addict

Interiors by Cindy Hulsey

My Name Is Lucy Barton, by Elizabeth Strout, who won the Pulitzer Prize for Olive Kitteridge, is a brief, quiet meditation on childhood, repressed feelings, haunting memories

An Unpleasant Vacation by Cindy Hulsey

Summer House with Swimming Pool by Herman Koch, is a disturbing novel, but one that is perfect for book discussion groups. The book is narrated by Dr. Marc Schlosser, a general practitioner who has a following due to his ability to look as though he is listening to his patients and because of his propensity to liberally dispense opiates.

A Tale Retold by Rebecca Howard

There are some authors whose books I’m always going to read—no matter what. If Jonathan Franzen’s next novel is a kitschy romantic comedy between a cat lover and a bird lover, I’m going to read it. If Louise Erdrich decides to abandon psychological literary fiction to write a slapstick western, sign me up! I may not like everything by these authors, but I’m such a fan of their writing that I’m always willing to try. Jeanette Winterson is one such author for me.

A Little Life reviewed by Duggan Phillips

Hanya Yanagihara's second novel, A Little Life, takes up the stories of four young men who, alike in exceptional drive and talent, form a tight-knit bond of friendship in college, a bond that is tested during the ups and downs they each experience in New York in the decades following their graduation.

Southern Tragedy by Cindy Hulsey

A strong sense of place anchors Robert Goolrick’s mythic Southern Gothic tale, Heading Out to Wonderful. Set in the late 1940s in a small town in Virginia, the story is told from the perspective of lapsed time. Sam Haislett, who was a young child at the time of the events he narrates, relates the tragic tale of a doomed love affair between two lonely outsiders.