Cindy's blog

Post-Sandy Disaster Fiction by Nick Abrahamson

It’s rather easy to be drawn to disaster fiction. Writers and poets task themselves with navigating and giving voice to our collective anxieties.  They at once offer clarity and comfort. It’s fiction as cultural critic, as social worker for the collective psyche.  It’s interpreter of events and also a proscription of remedies.  It’s a balance, too.

An Unlikely Read-Alike Pair by Laura Raphael

If you said you loved Zadie Smith’s funny, literary, character-driven novels, an easy read-alike recommendation to make would be E.M. Forster.

Sincerely Yours by Rebecca Howard

I like irony.  Irony is funny.  I’m a fan of David Letterman, Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert, and The Onion.  I enjoy darkly humorous books, and I’m not opposed to reading novels in which the main character is a terrible human being.  Still, I recognize that there’s a self-protective safety involved in remaining on the outside, looking in and (often) laughing at something.  There’s a certain amount of vulnerability required to express deep emotion about a person or a principle or idea—a vulnerability that is necessary for both the author and reader. 

The Books of Summer by Rebecca Howard

As I write this, we are experiencing the first full-fledged summer weather of the season—highs in the mid-90s, a light south wind, and a cloudless, expansive sky.   This is the summer I love.  Don’t talk to me in July when it’s too hot to be outside at 10 p.m., and you have to put booties on your dog when you take her out for a walk, so she won’t burn her paws crossing the street.  No, today is the perfect summer day—made for lazing poolside (friends with pools, call me!) with a great novel.   

House of Earth by Nick Abrahamson

This article first appeared in The July, 2013 edition of The Tulsa Book Review.

Pages