Family Reads

 

Want the latest family reading news in your email? Send an email to Mike Sullivan, Family literacy Specialist.

Talk Your Kid Smart!

Baby Talk Bonanza

Do you want your child to grow up a reader? Plant the seeds long before he/she learns to read. The number of words a child hears and says before they learn to read has a great deal to do with how well they do in school.

Words are the seeds that will grow into reading. The good news is that you add words to your child's world by doing something very natural: talking with your child. The better news is that you can add even more words by thinking about how you talk to your child.

Information on Kids You Can Count on

Kids Count Datacenter

How Kids Add Up

The Kids Count Datacenter, a project of the Annie E. Casey Foundation, collects information about kids and their welfare, and makes it easy to find. It breaks down reports nationally, by state, by county, and by city. Crime, health, education, financial status, and many more topics are there for the exploring. Have real information when headlines leave you scratching your head.

Try it yourself at: http://datacenter.kidscount.org/
 

 

Bedtime Reading, the Emotional Impact

Bedtime Reading is important

You might guess that reading to your child when he or she is very young helps them read better later, and that is true. But bedtime reading has an important emotional role to play. Research tells us that most of the reading problems in American school start around third grade. Even children who enter school with strong langtuage skills can hit a wall at this important time.

What Are Those "Reading Levels" Anyway?

Author Regina Powers

Have you ever wondered what the "RL" on the back of a kids' book means? Even if you know that it means reading level, what does that mean? And how is the reading level determined? Who gets to decide? And is THAT book really appropriate for a fourth grader? Here is an article written for librarians that does a great job of explaining the basics. For all parents who are looking for a little help in picking the right book for their child.

Are Screens a Form of Reading, or Just Plain Evil?

Are Screens a Form of Reading, or Just Plain Evil?

Don't take my word, or the author's word, on such an important question. There are no easy answers. Research shows that as far as reading development goes, reading on a screen is no different from reading on paper. But are there other costs? And which is more important? One side of the argument is laid out very clearly in this article. You can continue the discussions in the comments below.

Pages