Tulsa

New In The Digital Collections: A Mixed Bag Of Resources

bishop's

To prepare for the Central Library location close, Central employees are cleaning out desks and offices, organizing materials for the movers, and tying up loose ends as needed. 

In the Local History and Digital Collections Department, two or three items have been cleared from their temporary repository, and various digitization requests have been filled. 

J. J. Cale: 1938-2013

Born in Oklahoma and raised in Tulsa, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist  J. J. Cale died last week at the age of 74.

NPR's Dan Bobkoff writes, "His music took the edges off honky-tonk and blues, dressed them in a smoking jacket and ascot, and made them smooth."  You can hear Cale's smoking jacket and ascot adorned combination of blues, country, and rock on these cds:

New In The Digital Collections: Pictorially Presenting Greater Tulsa

Pictorially Presenting Greater Tulsa has been added to the digital collections.  It was issued by the Chamber of Commerce in honor of the first International Petroleum Exposition and Congress in 1923 and has photographs of Tulsa buildings, industry, religious institutions, and homes at that time. 

Achee Yahola: Lochapoka Chief

bend in main street tulsa

"The first founder of Tulsa thus rests in an unknown grave near the center of the present city."  --Angie Debo, Tulsa: From Creek Town to Oil Capital 

When the Lochapoka were removed from their Alabama home, Chief Achee Yahola  led them to present-day Tulsa, and he guided them during the difficult years that followed removal.

Debo says that the name "Yahola" was given to young men who had won recognition in war.

Barney S. Cleaver, Tulsa's First African-American Policeman

Home of Barney cleaver

Barney S. Cleaver, the first African-American policeman in Tulsa, was born in Newbern, VA in 1865. In Newbern, he attended public school until he was fifteen. He then moved to Charleston, WV where he initially worked on a steamer and later worked in the coal mines. As an Oklahoma & Gulf Coal Co. employee, he served as an immigrant agent, bringing more than four thousand employees from West Virginia to Oklahoma. 

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