Literacy

WORKSHOP: Reading Comprehension Strategies for Tutors

 

Join Penny Stack, MOT, OTR/L, CLT, from Dyslexia Institutes of America, to learn fresh strategy tips that focus on using visual and auditory memory along with visual perceptual activities that are often the underlying issue to comprehension challenges. Those who attended Penny Stack’s workshop about Dyslexia in February will remember how great her classes are!

 

Thursday, Oct. 10 • 6-7:30 p.m.

Hardesty Regional Library, Ash Meeting Room

8316 E. 93rd St.

 

Saturday at the Museum

Philbrook logo

A trip to a museum can be very educational, relaxing, and inspiring. If your learner is interested in visiting Philbrook, let him or her know that there is free admission on the second Saturday of each month. You could even consider taking a trip there in lieu of a tutoring session. www.philbrook.org gives great information about the museum, including a brief history of Villa Philbrook.

What Are Those "Reading Levels" Anyway?

Author Regina Powers

Have you ever wondered what the "RL" on the back of a kids' book means? Even if you know that it means reading level, what does that mean? And how is the reading level determined? Who gets to decide? And is THAT book really appropriate for a fourth grader? Here is an article written for librarians that does a great job of explaining the basics. For all parents who are looking for a little help in picking the right book for their child.

Listen Up!

Ear

If your ESL learner would like a good resource for listening practice at home, check out Randall's ESL Cyber Listening Lab at www.esl-lab.com. Listening exercises are divided into categories of easy, medium, and difficult. Each exercise has pre- and post-listening activities, such as discussion topics, comprehension questions, vocabulary exercises, and suggestions for extension activities.

Are Screens a Form of Reading, or Just Plain Evil?

Are Screens a Form of Reading, or Just Plain Evil?

Don't take my word, or the author's word, on such an important question. There are no easy answers. Research shows that as far as reading development goes, reading on a screen is no different from reading on paper. But are there other costs? And which is more important? One side of the argument is laid out very clearly in this article. You can continue the discussions in the comments below.

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