Literacy

Closing The 'Word Gap' Between Rich And Poor

Closing The 'Word Gap' Between Rich And Poor

“by the age of 3, children born into low-income families heard roughly 30 million fewer words than their more affluent peers.”

Literacy Resource Office Director Leslie Gelders

Check out this article about Leslie Gelders, the director of the Literacy Resources Office at the state Department of Libraries. We, and the other literacy offices of Oklahoma, could not do our jobs without the support we receive from the state. Thank you, Ms. Gelders!

How Stories Help the Brain

Reading has physical and immediate affects on the brain.

An Emory University study shows that stories actually build connections in the brain, a physical change that makes people better at language. Sound like something that might help your child?
See the whole story at:
http://esciencecommons.blogspot.com/2013/12/a-novel-look-at-how-stories-may-change.html
 

Conversation Circles

We are pleased to announce the return of Conversation Circles! Practice your English speaking and listening skills in these fun and friendly classes beginning January 13.

Mondays 5:30-6:30 p.m. at Herman and Kate Kaiser Library

Thursdays 1-2 p.m. at Kendall-Whittier Library

Call 918-549-7400 for more information.

One More Consideration When Deciding on TV Limits

Journal of the American Medical Association

“Prolonged TV viewing was associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. Television viewing is the most commonly reported daily activity apart from working and sleeping in many populations around the world. On average, 40% of daily free time is occupied by TV viewing within several European countries1 and 50% in Australia. This corresponds to a daily TV viewing time of about 3.5 to 4.0 hours. In the United States, the average number of daily hours of TV viewing has recently been reported to be 5 hours.”

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