Reading Addict

Food for Thought by Rebecca

My favorite part of Elizabeth Gilbert’s Eat, Pray, Love: One woman’s search for everything across Italy, India, and Indonesia, is definitely “Eat.” I love the way that Gilbert writes about feeding (literally) her soul with food that is slowly, beautifully, and artistically prepared. Love or hate the book in its entirety, Eat, Pray, Love is worth picking up if only for Gilbert’s description of her obsession with the pizza in Naples.

A History of the Emperor of All Maladies by Nick

In recent years historical chronicles of illnesses have made the publishing rounds. Just as one author might tackle the sprawling historicity of the Hapsburg’s, others have recently opted to focus their research on disease. Some have taken a light, humorous approach to disease and decay, Mary Roach’s Stiff for example, as opposed to a more traditionally dense, academic style. The latter, while thorough, doesn’t really do any favors for the lay person.

Illness as Genre by Rebecca

Disease itself doesn’t necessary qualify as a genre, but the impact that HIV/AIDS had upon the gay community in the 1980s and 1990s created a body of literature about the epidemic. Author Michael Cunningham described his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Hours, as a book about the AIDS crisis:

Rom Rachman's The Imperfectionists by Nick

It’s tempting to read The Imperfectionists as a case study for the modern newspaper: adapt or become obsolete. It’s also tempting to read The Imperfectionists as a dramatic miniseries which makes it difficult not to compare it to other dramatic period pieces, notably Mad Men . This would be a mistake, though.

America's Boy by Rebecca

Coming out is a phrase used so ubiquitously that it can almost stand for any revelation to another person—no matter how trivial. But, coming out is anything but trivial. Wade Rouse writes in his memoir America’s Boy :

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