Reading Addict

The Raphael Rerun Principle by Laura Raphael

The joke in my family is that I like reruns. From leftover pizza to watching that same episode of “Friends” for the tenth time, I find comfort in returning to what I’ve already encountered.

While this belies a rather conservative streak in my character, I suppose, I have an additional explanation: re-watching or re-reading (or re-eating) can also be a richer experience, deeper and more rewarding the second time round than the first.

Love Hurts by Cindy Hulsey

How well do we really know those we love?  And how far are we willing to go to deceive ourselves and others when it comes to matters of the heart? The Two Hotel Francforts by David Leavitt poses these questions.

The Young, The New, and the Restless by Rebecca Howard

Do you read New Adult (NA) fiction? Although coined by St. Martin’s Press in 2009, I’ve only begun regularly hearing and seeing this phrase in the past year or so.  New Adult fiction is touted as a way of bridging the gap between Young Adult (YA) and Adult Fiction.  Characters are generally between the ages of 18-26 and are experiencing “new adult” kind of things—going away to college, beginning a career, a serious relationship.

Travel Gone Wrong by Cindy Hulsey

I’ve been psyching myself up for a trip to New York for my step-daughter’s graduation from law school this spring.  This is not easy.  I haven’t flown since 1999 and over the past fifteen years my fear of flying has escalated into a full-blown phobia.  By contrast, I have friends who are avid world travelers.  They have vacationed in more than 100 countries.  As you can imagine, they find it hard to sympathize with my lack of enthusiasm for travel, but in my defense, there was that time my friend broke her arm hiking in some godforsaken country, had it set badly, and had to have i

Happy Books by Cindy Hulsey

I’ve been thinking about the concept of happiness quite a bit lately.  Maybe it’s because I’m growing older and wondering what it’s all about, or because I lost my father-in-law this year, or because the world becomes more complex and demanding by the minute.  The good news is that science has revealed that we can actually change our brains, making happiness attainable.  Two good books about how our brains adapt are The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains by Nicholas Carr, whi

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