Reading Addict

Getting Lost in Victor Lavalle's Big Machine by Nick

I picked up Victor Lavalle’s Big Machine and could not put it down. I know, I know, everyone and their mother uses that cliché to describe a great book. But for me, this is few and far between. While I love a well written novel, honestly it’s the first twenty pages that makes or breaks a book for me. If I can’t get into it within that span, chances are I will abandon it and continue my hunt for the next big score. So what hooked me? Fluid, seamless prose.

Slow Books by Rebecca

Some books you must read slowly. I call these slow books. In my classification system, “slow book” does not equal “bad book.” There is a distinction. Think slow food. Slow books are like French cooking. Sure, you could buy a packaged rotisserie chicken and use a carton of stock, but you would miss out on the aromas and flavors of the dish as it was truly intended. Slow books are those which must be savored. You cannot read these books too quickly, because you will miss the breathtaking sentences that are more poetry than prose.

Things Steve Amsterdam Didn't See Coming by Nick

Speculative fiction has never really been my bag. Sure, I like a good SciFi fare every now and then, but you won’t catch me reading the Left Behind series and if you press me about it, I’ll probably succumb to opining that most of Philip K. Dick’s books seem less like novels than rituals in paranoia. Doesn’t exactly make for interesting character driven fiction.

Things Steve Amsterdam Didn't See Coming by Nick

Speculative fiction has never really been my bag. Sure, I like a good SciFi fare every now and then, but you won’t catch me reading the Left Behind series and if you press me about it, I’ll probably succumb to opining that most of Philip K. Dick’s books seem less like novels than rituals in paranoia. Doesn’t exactly make for interesting character driven fiction.

Lose Yourself in The Lost City of Z by Lance

I was bitten by the travel bug. I was not bitten by the travel bug that causes maggots to hatch under your skin and pop their little maggot heads out as if to say hello and wish you well during your visit to their little unexplored corner of the world. I have to admit, however, that I did take guilty pleasure reading the tales of such encounters between man and insect, but I will come back to that.

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