Tulsa Area History

On Film: Oklahoma's African-American Communities In The Twenties

greenwood street

The Solomon Sir Jones film collection is available online from Yale University's Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library. The collection consists of 29 silent black and white films that document  African-American communities in Oklahoma from 1924 to 1928.

Fade Into You: Tulsa's Absorption Of The Small Place

tulsa ghost towns

In his Tulsa Tribune article, "Some Tulsa County Towns Are Only Faded Memories," Jim Downing pointed out that before Tulsa County was the City of Tulsa and everything else, the city was just a small part of everything else. Initally, the everything else consisted of small places that provided goods and that were spaced at convenient distances , allowing those travelling by team and wagon to make the roundtrip during daylight hours. Later, settlements sprang up along the railroad line as it expanded. Over time, many of these places ceased to exist, at least officially. 

New In The Digital Collections: Pictorially Presenting Greater Tulsa

Pictorially Presenting Greater Tulsa has been added to the digital collections.  It was issued by the Chamber of Commerce in honor of the first International Petroleum Exposition and Congress in 1923 and has photographs of Tulsa buildings, industry, religious institutions, and homes at that time. 

Achee Yahola: Lochapoka Chief

bend in main street tulsa

"The first founder of Tulsa thus rests in an unknown grave near the center of the present city."  --Angie Debo, Tulsa: From Creek Town to Oil Capital 

When the Lochapoka were removed from their Alabama home, Chief Achee Yahola  led them to present-day Tulsa, and he guided them during the difficult years that followed removal.

Debo says that the name "Yahola" was given to young men who had won recognition in war.

French Place Names In Oklahoma

spavinaw, olahoma

In the Dictionary of French Place Names in The U.S.A., René Coulet Du Gard writes that the first Frenchmen who came to the United States can be divided into three categories: the mainly Canadian-born trappers and wood scouts or "coureurs des bois," the missionaries, and those serving the House of France.

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