Tulsa Area History

Women’s History Month: Tulsa's Joy Harjo and S.E. Hinton in BIC

biography in context database

It's Women's History Month and two of Tulsa's own, S. E. Hinton and Joy Harjo, are featured in the Library database Biography in Context (BIC).  BIC is a comprehensive collection of biographical information on people throughout history and across all subject areas.  You can limit your search in the database by birth or death place. You can also limit the search by gender, nationality, occupation, and ethnicity.

Tulsa Foundation for Architecture White Glove Open House Series: Art Deco

Mark your calendars and plan to attend the White Glove Open House Series: Art Deco at the TFA Archives, 321 South Boston, Lower Level 01, on Friday, March 1 from 4:30-7:30 p.m. Light hors d'oeuvres will be served. The event is free and open to the public.

Tulsa is known the world over for its outstanding Art Deco architecture, and the Tulsa Foundation for Architecture is pleased to be a repository for thousands of the original hand-drawn architectural drawings and renderings of some of these iconic buildings and residences.

Feedback Tulsa Topic: Downtown, More Buildings Or More Surface Parking?

Tulsa Metropolitan Area Planning Commission (TMAPC) will begin considering regulatory changes at their work session today, and it would be helpful to have community feedback on the development of downtown Tulsa. In a nutshell, TMAPC would like to know which photograph on the left matches your vision for downtown? Would you like to see more buildings or more surface parking? You can weigh in here:  http://www.feedbacktulsa.org/portals/121/Forum_355/Issue_1174?a=133

African-American History Month: Oklahoma's Sundown Towns

James W. Loewen, professor emeritus of sociolology at the University of Vermont, writes in Southern Cultures:

African-American History Month: WPA Oklahoma Slave Narrative, Mary Grayson

mose perryman

Mary Grayson was born into slavery in Indian Territory. Her parents were owned by Mose Perryman (pictured left), and they lived in the Choska (pronounced Choe-skey) bottoms, a fertile floodplain across the Arkansas river from Haskell. She describes Creek Indian division during the Civil War, including a bit about Opothle Yahola:

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