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Now Read This! The Knife of Never Letting Go by Melanie

Ever wish you could hear what other people are thinking? In Patrick Ness'' curiously titled, award-winning novel, The Knife of Never Letting Go , your wish is granted--but be careful what you wish for. Protagonist Todd Hewitt can hear the thoughts of every living creature around him, and all he wishes is that it would stop. He is the last remaining child in Prentisstown, a small town formed by colonists from Earth, sent to populate an alien planet.

Chuck Palahniuk Is an Old Hat by Nick

Chuck Palahniuk Is an Old Hat

Well, more like my favorite shirt. A shirt I will wear once a week for 10 years. One that I refuse to let go of, that has stitching resembling crooked scars to patch up the holes and it frays at the edges. One day it will have more homemade stitching than original fabric. It’s comfortable and familiar and I won’t throw it out.

The Year of the Tudors by Rebecca

Who is not completely fascinated by Henry VIII? My interest in Tudor England began with a trip to England with an Episcopal choir. We sang Evensong service every night for a week at Ely Cathedral. We were also fortunate enough to go to Canterbury, York, Lincoln, and London. When you process into the choir stall and walk over stones that literally have been worn thin by worshippers before you, the sense of history is palpable. Also lingering are the remnants of the major social, political, and religious upheavals of King Henry’s reign.

Seeing Sounds, Feeling Colors by Nick

In The Yellow Wallpaper , Charlotte Gilman Perkins first introduced me to the concept of synesthesia, the odd, kinetic sensation of having the senses cross pathways: Being able to ‘feel’ a color, hear images, or smell sounds. Perkins links this strange neurological condition with the protagonist’s ‘hysterical depression’. The character’s exact cause of her synesthetic sensations is debatable.

I Hate You for Making Me Understand You by Laura

One result of reading fiction is that it often lets you into the skin of people you wouldn’t otherwise meet or know – by walking around inside their skulls, metaphorically speaking, you develop an empathy, an understanding, of their needs, their fears and hopes, their very humanness.

Sometimes I hate that.

Especially when I am determined to hate a character(s).

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