Blogs

I'm trying to find out exactly when my grandfather passed away, and I know he lived in the Tulsa area. Where can I look for this information?

The library has a couple of tools that can help you find the death dates of people who lived in or around Tulsa at the time they passed away. First, the Tulsa World database, found in our alphabetical list of library databases, has an online archive from 1990-present. Along with news articles, this archive includes birth and death notices from the past two decades. To find a notice, type in the deceased person's name in the first ‘All Text' search field, then change the second search field to ‘Section' and type in ‘Deaths'.

Ecstatic Fiction by Nick

In college I attended a lecture where the late great Kurt Vonnegut spoke to a humid room full of of English and Creative Writing majors. He ruminated on quite a few things, jumping from tangent to tangent as if he was merely thinking aloud instead of speaking to an auditorium full of wide eyed, enthusiastic wannabe writers and critics. Sure, I would have preferred to hear him wax on the future of rhetoric, the changing role of fiction in contemporary America, but I was in the same room as Kurt Vonnegut, so I really couldn’t ask more from my experience.

I'd like to find out who owns an empty house up the street from me. Can I access the County Land Records at the library?

Yes, the library does have access to the Tulsa County Land Records. Using these databases, you can look up residential and commercial properties by address, owner, subdivision, and more. You can also access the Land Records to find out information about your own property, such as square footage, year built, and tax details. If you are looking to buy a home, it's also a good resource to see if your potential new home has any existing liens before you buy.

The End of the World As We Knew It by Rebecca

The minute I finish a really amazing novel, I am usually at a loss for words. It’s kind of ironic that my first reaction to the powerful and artful use of language is silence. Maybe that’s the appropriate response to art. Still, I will try to cobble some words together, so that I might share with others how much I loved Adam Haslet’s novel Union Atlantic . Readers’ Advisory Librarian Joyce Saricks encourages librarians to write down three words that describe every book they read.

The Amazing Three States of Amazement by Rebecca

As I’m writing this post, news is swirling about the death of Osama Bin Laden. And in the hours after this news, national fatigue, doubt, and anxiety gave way to spontaneous cheering in Washington , New York, and, most likely in private residences throughout the country. We feel a collective sense of pride and a sigh of relief this morning, but I have to wonder at what will remain—how citizens will construct meaning from this decade long mission and what the American identity will look like in another ten years.

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