Cindy's blog

A Moment of Truth by Rebecca

This Beautiful Life by Helen Schulman is the story of a family in crisis. Richard and Liz Bergamot have moved to New York City from Ithaca in anticipation of Richard’s professional advancement. They have two children—a 15-year-old son, Jake, and a 6-year-old daughter, Coco. One night, after attending a party, Jake receives an explicit email from a young girl. He forwards it to a friend, who forwards it to another friend, until the email and its attached video has gone viral.

Another Impossible Debut by Nick

In my estimation any book review that can be tagged ‘debut’, somewhere in the body probably would read ‘his/her scope and ambition far exceeds his/her execution and while there are some good ideas therein, much of the plot is meandering, aimless, and poorly developed.’ Fortunately, I am usually quite wrong and although I find it as incalculable as theoretical physics, young writers are publishing astonishing debuts and a dearth of excellent fiction, praise be the heavens, is not imminent.

Girls, Girls, Girls by Laura

When my nephew was much younger and not yet acclimated to the pretend-gender-wars dynamic of family Game Night, he started to cry when my sister and I taunted the “boys” team with chants of “Girls rule, boys drool!”

(It’s okay. We apologized and explained, he felt better, and nobody remembers who won or lost because that’s not the point of Game Night, anyway, is it?)

But it reminds me of what it’s like to be a child – boy or girl – and how confusing, overwhelming, and lost you can feel when you’re expected to know the exact rules of each new situation.

Laugh until It Hurts by Rebecca

There’s a strange sense of pleasure I get from reading Tom Perrotta. Although his novels have an entertaining, gossipy, and voyeuristic quality, they have substantial substance at their core. They are at once laugh-out-loud funny and acerbic social commentaries. In his latest novel The Leftovers, the world has experienced a rapture-like phenomenon. Millions have disappeared, and those remaining are left to piece together their lives.

2011 Man Booker Prize Winner by Nick

The first thing one notices when reading Julian Barnes’ Man Booker Prize winning novel, The Sense of an Ending , is the impossible elegance of the writing. Henry James elegant. The subject matter certainly lends itself to the tasteful, somber, sometimes playful writing.

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