Cindy's blog

Under the Spell of Meg Wolitzer by Rebecca

Meg Wolitzer’s books generally focus on women’s lives, psychologies, and relationships in a thoughtful, honest, and compassionate way. They reflect a feminism that is wise, hard-fought, and grown up. There are no easy answers and no moralizing. Men are equally hurt by gender roles, and women are equally flawed. She extends grace to her characters, which makes us see ourselves in them.

Are You a Librarian or a Rock Star?

Several months ago I came across a blog post in the online version of the Guardian titled “How the Brontës Divide Humanity” by Imogen Russell Williams.

Film Adaptations: Winners, Losers, and a Draw by Nick

No doubt you’ve participated in the eternal discussion as any avid, passionate reader has: which is better? Should I see the movie or read the book? Was the filmmaker hopeless or inspired? Did they lose the plot in favor of cheap CGI thrills? Below are some notables that stand out.

The Winners:

The Book of Love by Rebecca

Geek alert! Two of my favorite things have come together: Dictionaries and David Levithan ! David Levithan is an author, editorial director at Scholastic, and founder of PUSH, an imprint that seeks and promotes new and original voices in teen literature. Levithan is most well known for his affirming, heartfelt, and quirky young adult novels like Boy Meets Boy .

Conspiracy Fiction by Nick

If you think Oliver Stone has the conspiracy bug, take a moment and introduce yourself to some of the more creative and paranoid works major, award winning authors have written. Sure, most everyone is aware of The Da Vinci Code and Dan Brown’s unique brand of conspiratorial suspense, but he by no means is the only paranoid fiction writer. Below are some of the better novels that incorporate age old conspiracy theories.

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