Cindy's blog

Books People Are Talking About by Lynette

Lynette facilitates the book discussion group at the Helmerich Library. At each meeting they read books on a particular topic or books by the same author and share their opinions. Below is the newsletter she shared with her group after their February meeting.

Paul Auster's New York by Nick

When you read Sunset Park by Paul Auster you get the sense of an older New York as described by an old guard New Yorker. New York before Harlem and Brooklyn gentrification, when struggling writers chatted with prodding editors over knishes at deli countertops. When the Dodgers played in Brooklyn and stats were catalogued in steel trap minds rather than fantasy league spreadsheets.

Food for Thought by Rebecca

My favorite part of Elizabeth Gilbert’s Eat, Pray, Love: One woman’s search for everything across Italy, India, and Indonesia, is definitely “Eat.” I love the way that Gilbert writes about feeding (literally) her soul with food that is slowly, beautifully, and artistically prepared. Love or hate the book in its entirety, Eat, Pray, Love is worth picking up if only for Gilbert’s description of her obsession with the pizza in Naples.

A History of the Emperor of All Maladies by Nick

In recent years historical chronicles of illnesses have made the publishing rounds. Just as one author might tackle the sprawling historicity of the Hapsburg’s, others have recently opted to focus their research on disease. Some have taken a light, humorous approach to disease and decay, Mary Roach’s Stiff for example, as opposed to a more traditionally dense, academic style. The latter, while thorough, doesn’t really do any favors for the lay person.

Illness as Genre by Rebecca

Disease itself doesn’t necessary qualify as a genre, but the impact that HIV/AIDS had upon the gay community in the 1980s and 1990s created a body of literature about the epidemic. Author Michael Cunningham described his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Hours, as a book about the AIDS crisis:

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