Peter's blog

I’d like to volunteer at my local library branch. How do I go about that?

The Tulsa library system has hundreds of volunteers, from teenagers to retirees, who help us with our day to day operations, and we are very glad for the time and effort they donate to the library. Volunteers perform a variety of tasks, from shelving books and serving as an After School Homework Club coach to tutoring a Literacy student or adding book and movie reviews to our online catalog.

Where Can I Go To Find The Business Hours For The Different Library Locations?

Because many of our libraries are open for different durations, we've posted the hours of operation for each branch on our website. From the homepage, simply select the Locations tab on the far right side of the page. This will give you a full list of the libraries around the county and the business hours for each day of the current week. To the right of the weekly schedules is a list of holidays that all libraries will be closed throughout the year.

Summer officially has begun and it's heating up. Is there a list of pool or splash pads around town?

You're in luck! The library has a database called Tulsa Organizations and Services (or TOS) which includes a wealth of information about Tulsa area groups and facilities, goverment agencies and departments, and other local resources. Included in the database is a list of public swimming pools, water playgrounds, and splash pads open in the Tulsa County area this summer. 

This past week marks the anniversary of the 1921 Tulsa Race Riot. Where can I learn more about what happened?

The Tulsa Race Riot, which began on May 31, 1921, is a chapter of our city’s history about which many people, including a lot of native Tulsans, know very little, despite the fact that it resulted in the deaths of hundreds of people and the destruction of an entire section of town. The library, through our African American Resource Center (or AARC), has compiled a list of resources about the event and the conditions that caused it. These items include a number of books, periodicals and electronic media, as well as educator kits and links to other local agencies.

I want to get my GED, but need to study up for it first. Where can I start?

If you want to take the GED, the library can help you prepare to take the test. We have multiple databases that offer skill building programs, tutorials, and practice tests, as well as a list of community resources that provide GED classes and testing. To access these resources from our home page, go to the Research & Learn tab and look in the Research by Subject column.