Ruth G. Hardman Adult Literacy Service

One in six adults in Tulsa County cannot read the prescription label on a medicine bottle, understand a newspaper article, or enter complete information on an application.

The mission of the Ruth G. Hardman Adult Literacy Services is to promote literacy across the lifespan through emergent and family literacy outreach initiatives and adult basic and English language instruction.  Learn more about the Tulsa City County Library’s literacy efforts by exploring the following links.

Become a Tutor  Become a Tutor                      Become a Learner  Become a Learner

Current Tutors  Current Tutors                          English Language Learners  English Language Learning

Literacy Facts & Statistics  Literacy Facts and Statistics    Computer Literacy  Computer Literacy

Learning Diversity  Learning Diversity                    Family Literacy  Family Literacy

Lit Bits  Literacy Newsletter                  Reading Roadshow  Reading Roadshow

The Ruth G. Hardman Adult Literacy Service office is located at 2901 S. Harvard.
Phone: 918.549.7400
Fax: 918.549.7405
Office hours: M - F, 9am - 5pm


The Basics:

HOW THE PROGRAM WORKS

Volunteers are trained to teach adult learners who want to improvetheir reading skills. The volunteers attend a12-hour training workshop and commit to work in the program for one year. Tutors are then matched with an adult learner and they work together at least once week for one hour at a public place that is mutually convenient (usually a library.)

A BRIEF  HISTORY

The library's adult literacy effort began in 1977 as the only Literacy Volunteers of America (LVA) affiliate west of the Mississippi River. It was staffed by a librarian who volunteered 10 hours per week to the literacy service. During the 1980s an increasing amount of media and public attention focused on the problem of illiteracy. In 1990 the library hired a full-time literacy coordinator. The program was renamed in honor of benefactor Ruth G. Hardman in 1993.

CURRENT  STARISTICS

Today, the program matches 200 students with 200 volunteer tutors.  In all, more than 3,000 adult students have improved their reading skills through our services.

Each year, our program also reaches over 1,300 young readers in Tulsa through our family literacy programs.  By distributing quality children’s books to needy families and by educating parents about the importance of reading with their children, we work to stop the cycle of illiteracy.

NATIONAL

Tulsa's program is an affiliate of ProLiteracy America.  As an affiliate, Tulsa’s program uses ProLiteracy America teaching materials to develop lesson plans to meet the individual needs of each adult learner and their tutor.

STUDENT  SERVICES

The literacy service provides basic literacy and English language  instruction to young adults  (16+) and adults who read at or below a sixth-grade level. English language learners must speak enough conversational English to be matched to an English speaking tutor.

Every student who requests a tutor must complete an intake interview which includes a reading assessment and background information (helpful in matching volunteers with learners).  New students then complete a student orientation session before being matched to a tutor.

LOCAL  SUPPORT

The growth of the library's adult literacy service is a direct result of the following community participation:

More than 200 individuals volunteer their time as tutors, trainers, interviewers,  and office staff.

The George Kaiser Family Foundation provides contributions for the ESL portion of our program.

The Krueger Foundation, the Waters Foundation, Friends of the Public Library, Target Community Giving, Boeing (now Spirit AeroSystems), and many other generous contributors have made our family literacy programs possible.

Tulsa Community College offers three hours of college credit to tutors.

The library’s literacy service also partners with the Oklahoma Department of Libraries, the Oklahoma Literacy Coalition, and the Learning Disabilities Association of Oklahoma.

We believe the ability to read is critical to personal freedom and the maintenance of a democratic society.

Literacy projects and programs are sponsored by