Ian McEwan

Love Hurts by Cindy Hulsey

How well do we really know those we love?  And how far are we willing to go to deceive ourselves and others when it comes to matters of the heart? The Two Hotel Francforts by David Leavitt poses these questions.

Slow Burn Books by Rebecca Howard

On the week before Banned Book Week, I’m reluctant to type “burn” and “book” in the same sentence.  However, “slow burn” is probably the best way to describe the pacing and the key appeal of The Silent Wife—a recent psychological thriller by A.S.A. Harrison.  With book jacket blurbs from the likes of Elizabeth George and S.J.

No Delayed gratification Required by Rebecca Howard

I spend a lot of time writing about books that I’ve recently finished.  Many of these titles are newly published, which means that they likely have a long list of holds at the library.  Considering that you might want to check out some titles after reading about them, I thought I’d do an overview of some of my favorite titles that are a little older and less in demand—although no less impressive or enjoyable! All annotations are from NoveList. 

An Unlikely Read-Alike Pair by Laura Raphael

If you said you loved Zadie Smith’s funny, literary, character-driven novels, an easy read-alike recommendation to make would be E.M. Forster.

Making Sense of Tragedy by Rebecca Howard

I always find it interesting to know why a person reads.  Is she reading for information, enlightenment or escape?  Generally speaking, I read in order to make sense or to make meaning.  While I am often nothing like the characters about which I read, they teach me or help me understand something in a new way.  Walking around in another character’s head for a while helps me develop greater empathy for my fellow humans.  It may even help me be kinder to myself.  I think this why I so frequently read b