Laura Moriarty

The Best of Both Worlds by Cindy Hulsey

I enjoy learning about history from reading fiction. I find it far more interesting and less likely to be bloated with the boring parts of history—politics and war—and more focused on people and how political situations and cultural changes directly affect them. I like historical fiction and lately seem to be particularly drawn to novels that feature real people. I’m currently reading Beautiful Fools: The Last Affair of Zelda and Scott Fitzgerald by R. Clifton Spargo.

Make Mine a Moriarty by Laura Raphael

Recently, another librarian and I were batting around title ideas for a new book discussion group when I had to stop and double-check the names for two authors. Was I remembering their names correctly? Surely they didn’t BOTH share “Moriarty” as a last name. I mean, that’s kind of unusual, isn’t it?

The Books of Summer by Rebecca Howard

As I write this, we are experiencing the first full-fledged summer weather of the season—highs in the mid-90s, a light south wind, and a cloudless, expansive sky.   This is the summer I love.  Don’t talk to me in July when it’s too hot to be outside at 10 p.m., and you have to put booties on your dog when you take her out for a walk, so she won’t burn her paws crossing the street.  No, today is the perfect summer day—made for lazing poolside (friends with pools, call me!) with a great novel.   

Breaking the First Rule of Book Club by Rebecca Howard

Photo of Rebecca Howard

I want to talk about book clubs.  I’ve been involved with several over the years and have found them to be deeply rewarding—each in their own ways.  There are a few dangerous pitfalls that book clubs have to strive to avoid, though.  In no particular order, here they are:
1) The book club becomes a wine club
2) The book club becomes a whine club
3) Not everyone reads the book
4) One individual (who typically has not read the entire book) dominates discussion
5) The same person selects titles each month