Oklahoma

On Film: Oklahoma's African-American Communities In The Twenties

greenwood street

The Solomon Sir Jones film collection is available online from Yale University's Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library. The collection consists of 29 silent black and white films that document  African-American communities in Oklahoma from 1924 to 1928.

French Place Names In Oklahoma

spavinaw, olahoma

In the Dictionary of French Place Names in The U.S.A., René Coulet Du Gard writes that the first Frenchmen who came to the United States can be divided into three categories: the mainly Canadian-born trappers and wood scouts or "coureurs des bois," the missionaries, and those serving the House of France.

New Website OklahomaGives Aids Nonprofits and Volunteers in Disaster Relief

 

The Oklahoma Center for Nonprofits has launched a new website OklahomaGives.org to help nonprofits and supporters share their stories of support, communicate needs and show that Oklahoma is truly one of the greatest and most generous states in the country.

African-American History Month: Oklahoma's Sundown Towns

James W. Loewen, professor emeritus of sociolology at the University of Vermont, writes in Southern Cultures:

African-American History Month: WPA Oklahoma Slave Narrative, Mary Grayson

mose perryman

Mary Grayson was born into slavery in Indian Territory. Her parents were owned by Mose Perryman (pictured left), and they lived in the Choska (pronounced Choe-skey) bottoms, a fertile floodplain across the Arkansas river from Haskell. She describes Creek Indian division during the Civil War, including a bit about Opothle Yahola:

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