rebecca

Awful, Horrible, Despicable Characters and the Readers Who Love Them by Rebecca

Okay, so let’s agree right now that Jonathan Franzen needs no more press. Long before Freedom’s release date, the novel’s buzz was met with a feminist critique of the New York Times’ Book Review, lead by novelists Jodi Piccoult and Jennifer Weiner.

He may, in fact, be laughing at me, not with me by Rebecca

Books that confront as much as they comfort are among my favorites. Maybe that’s why I love Sherman Alexie so much. One minute I am smirking at his self-deprecating, ironic humor; I’m feeling on the inside--a part of his demographic-- and laughing at the same things. Then, one sentence later, I realize that I’ve become the butt of his jokes. His humor has a sharp edge, and no one is exempt from being exposed as “frail and finite”—a phrase used multiple times in his latest collection War Dances .

The Year of the Tudors by Rebecca

Who is not completely fascinated by Henry VIII? My interest in Tudor England began with a trip to England with an Episcopal choir. We sang Evensong service every night for a week at Ely Cathedral. We were also fortunate enough to go to Canterbury, York, Lincoln, and London. When you process into the choir stall and walk over stones that literally have been worn thin by worshippers before you, the sense of history is palpable. Also lingering are the remnants of the major social, political, and religious upheavals of King Henry’s reign.

Slow Books by Rebecca

Some books you must read slowly. I call these slow books. In my classification system, “slow book” does not equal “bad book.” There is a distinction. Think slow food. Slow books are like French cooking. Sure, you could buy a packaged rotisserie chicken and use a carton of stock, but you would miss out on the aromas and flavors of the dish as it was truly intended. Slow books are those which must be savored. You cannot read these books too quickly, because you will miss the breathtaking sentences that are more poetry than prose.

Midlife—Not for the Weak of Heart by Rebecca

Say midlife crisis and your first images are bound to be impractical sports cars, hair implants, and gold jewelry. The words predictable, pathetic or cliché may come to mind. Maybe it is a result of my own age that I’m feeling a little less harsh and a little more empathetic about the experiences of those entering middle adulthood. Maybe it’s discovering the novels of Jonathan Tropper.

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